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About the 95th



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The 95th in the USA

The 95th Bomb Group – based in Horham in Suffolk from June 1943 until the end of the war – was famously the first US group to bomb Berlin in daylight during WW2.

The last B-17 Flying Fortress shot down in Europe was from Horham and the 95th was awarded the Presidential Unit Citation (Distinguished Unit Citation) on three occa­sions, the most of any bomb group.

The group received its first Presidential Unit Citation for main­taining a tight defensive form­a­tion in spite of severe assault by enemy fighters while bombing an aircraft assembly plant at Regensburg in Germany on August 17th 1943.

It was awarded the second for with­standing concen­trated attacks by fighters during the approach to the target and intense anti-aircraft fire directly over the objective while effect­ively bombing rail marshalling yards at Münster on October 10th 1943.

The unit received its third citation for the first daylight raid on the German capital on March 4th 1944 – while many parti­cip­ating groups, because of weather condi­tions, either aban­doned the oper­a­tion or struck other targets, the 95th proceeded to Berlin and success­fully bombed a suburb of the German capital despite snowstorms, dense clouds, and severe enemy attack.

The 95th flew more than 300 missions and, as well as stra­tegic bombing sorties, targeting harbours, indus­tries, rail yards and cities, it dropped food and supplies to starving civil­ians and the resist­ance in occupied Europe, it supported the D-Day invasion and ended the war trans­porting liber­ated pris­oners of war back to the UK.

Glenn Miller also famously played in one of the hangars at Horham Airfield on his final tour before his disap­pear­ance.


95th Dates & Facts

Operations:
European Theatre, May 13th 1943-April 20th 1945
Campaigns:
Air Offensive, Europe; Normandy; Northern France; Rhineland; Ardennes-Alsace; Central Europe, Air Combat, European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre.
Assigned to:
III Bomber Command, June 15th 1942;
II Bomber Command, June 26th 1942;
Eighth Air Force, May 11th 1943;
VIII Bomber Command, May 19th 1943;
4th Bombardment Wing, May 25th 1943;
Attached to 402nd Provisional Combat Wing Bombardment (Heavy), June 6th -September 12th 1943;
3rd Bombardment Division, September 13th 1943;
13th Combat Bombardment Wing (Heavy) (later, 13 Bombardment Wing, Heavy), September 14th 1943-August 1945.
Stationed at:
Barksdale Field, Louisiana, June 15th 1942;
Pendleton Field, Oregon, June 26th 1942;
Geiger Field, Washington, August 28th 1942;
Ephrata Army Air Base, Washington, October 31th 1942;
Geiger Field, Washington, November 24th 1942;
Rapid City Army Air Base, South Dakota, December 17th 1942-March 11th 1943;
RAF Alconbury (USAAF Station 102) April 15th 1943-June;
RAF Framlingham (USAAF Station 153), England, May-June 15th 1943 (during May and early June the 95th operated from both Alconbury & Framlingham;
RAF Horham (USAAF Station 119), England, June 15th 1943-June 19th 1945;
Sioux Falls Army Air Field, South Dakota, August 14th -28th 1945.
Decorations:
The 95th was the only Bomb Group to receive three Distinguished Unit Citations.
These were for:
  • Maintaining a tight defensive form­a­tion in spite of severe assault by enemy fighters and bombing the aircraft assembly plant at Regensburg, Germany, on August 17th 1943.
  • Withstanding concen­trated attacks by fighters during the approach to the target and intense anti­air­craft fire directly over the objective, but still effect­ively bombarding marshalling yards at Münster on October 10th 1943.
  • Proceeding to Berlin and success­fully bombing a suburb of the German capital despite snowstorms, dense clouds, and severe enemy attack while many parti­cip­ating organ­isa­tions, because of weather condi­tions, either aban­doned the oper­a­tion or struck other targets, on March 4th 1944.